Our Own Jackie Hunter Featured on WTVR Virginia in the Morning

“Lost in the Red Hills of Mars”

RICHMOND, Va. – Jackie Hunter, retired educator turned science fiction writer, is using several creative outlets these days to encourage young people to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and math. She stopped by the studio to talk about one of those projects, her debut novel called Lost in the Red Hills of Mars. To learn more about Jackie Hunter and her new book, you can visit her websites atwww.therippyeffect.com or www.lostintheredhillsofmars.com. You can also find her new book on Amazon.com. 

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The Price of Editing…

From  at The Write Life:

For comparison purposes, let’s look at the editing rates and use an average page-per-hour and an average hourly rate. For instance, the EFA lists basic copyediting of 5–10 pages per hour at a cost of $30–$40 per hour, so I’ve assumed 7.5 pages per hour at a cost of $35 per hour. The other total calculations also use their respective average rates.

For a 70,000-word book, your editing costs could be:

  • Developmental editing: $.08 per word, or $5,600 total
  • Basic copyediting: $.018 per word, or $1,260 total
  • Proofreading: $.0113, or $791 total

It’s easy to extrapolate from this what your total expected editing cost could be. Fantasy, sci-fi, and epic novel writers should be forewarned.

For a 120,000-word book, your editing costs could be:

  • Developmental editing: $.08 per word, or $9,600 total
  • Basic copyediting: $.018 per word, or $2,160 total
  • Proofreading: $.0113, or $1,356 total

Realize that these are simply one website’s average estimates for editorial costs. For further comparison, CreateSpace offers copyediting at $.016 per word for books longer than 10,000 words. Pronoun’s list of editors is also an easy way to compare many editors’ costs.

Read More at The Write Life…

A 12-year-old boy who can’t speak wrote a book with his eyes

DghtgkWXkAM1iD1(CNN) Twelve-year-old Jonathan Bryan can’t verbally speak or physically write. He was born with severe cerebral palsy, has limited motion in his limbs and is in a wheelchair.

For most of his life, Jonathan’s parents used nonverbal cues like a smile or a frown to communicate with him. Educators determined he had profound learning difficulties and never taught him to read or write in school.

That all changed when Jonathan’s mom, Chantal Bryan, began taking him out of school for a few hours a day to read and write. By the time Jonathan was 9, he could spell anything he wanted to say.

Now with the help of an E-Tran frame, Jonathan not only communicates — he wrote a book.

Read more at CNN…

Practical Writing Tips

I don’t like to share promos or ads. But this advice from Writers Life is pretty good. It matches a lot of what I’ve been telling my writers at the Agile Writer Workshop. While I don’t necessarily endorse the Writers Life products, I do like their advice. Caveat emptor…

Practical Writing Tips You Can Actually Use
1. Say something; Think about what your message is
2. Use short sentences & simple language
3. Be specific & use details
4. Use an active voice
5. Break up your text
6. Don’t overwrite
7. Become a brutal editor

Get more tips and tricks in our ‘Get It Done’ toolkit: http://www.writerslife.org/writing-tips-toolkit

Evoking Emotion in Fiction: 7 Pragmatic Ways to Make Readers Give a Damn

In Writer’s Digest, author Dustin Grimmel gives these 7 ways to engage readers. Do you agree?

  • Evoking Emotion #1: Positive moral judgments about the protagonist
  • Evoking Emotion #2: A protagonist who wants something really badly
  • Evoking Emotion #3: A protagonist who pursues their desires
  • Evoking Emotion #4: A protagonist who never gives up
  • Evoking Emotion #5: Characters who do the right thing
  • Evoking Emotion #6: The benefits of sorrow
  • Evoking Emotion #7: Characters helped by unseen hands

Read more at Writers Digest.

Hollywood comes calling for self-published authors

Film and TV production companies are increasingly turning to self-published authors to pick up potential screen blockbusters.

The latest indie writer to get a call from Hollywood is best-selling thriller author Mark Dawson.

Advanced negotiations are taking place with a leading TV production company that wants to snap up his Beatrix Rose series, according to a report in The Guardian.

Mark Dawson is a prolific author of thrillers who has written four series of novels. The John Milton books feature a hitman while the Beatrix Rose series also has the leading character of an assassin. The Soho Noir novels are set in London from 1940 to 1970 and there’s also the Isabella Rose thriller series (she’s the daughter of Beatrix Rose).

 

 

Read More at Roger Packer’s Blog.

The Science of the Plot Twist

“A major part of the pleasure of plot twists, too, comes not from the shock of surprise, but from looking back at the early bits of the narrative in light of the twist. The most satisfying surprises get their power from giving us a fresh, better way of making sense of the material that came before. This is another opportunity for stories to turn the curse of knowledge to their advantage.

Remember that once we know the answer to a puzzle, its clues can seem more transparent than they really were. When we revisit early parts of the story in light of that knowledge, well-constructed clues take on new, satisfying significance.”

Read more at The Conversation