Life in 10 Introduces Hybrid Publishing Service in RVA

Our friend Valley Haggard over at Life in 10 Minutes has just launched a hybrid press. The concept behind a hybrid press is different from an independent or even traditional press. With hybrid, the publisher acts as an assistant to the writer. For a fee, they will perform all the activities that transform your manuscript into a publishable book – but the author retains the rights and royalties. Typical cost for an 80,000 word book is $3,900.

From their website…

“Sales via third party vendors such as bookstores are processed and fulfilled through IngramSprark’s print-on-demand (POD) services. Typically, a book sold through a bookstore or other vendor will net 50% of its sales price (or $7.50 for a $15 book). Average manufacturing costs range from $3 to $5 depending on book size, as well as several other factors. Net profits (net sales price – manufacturing costs) are divided 60% to the author and 40% to Life in 10 Minutes Press. Life in 10 Minutes pays earnings to our authors quarterly. Your project manager will deliver a payment schedule to you during the production process.”

Hybrid publishing is a growing movement in the self-publishing world. It offers the advantages of self-publishing for those without the skill, resources, or time to do the work themselves. And it relieves a lot of the drudgery that is often associated with the business side of self-publishing.

However, just as in traditional or independent publishing, the author is still very much on their own for marketing. Hybrid presses (and L10 Press in particular) will send out notices to their marketing channels. However, it is still up to the author to create a platform for getting the word out and marketing their books.

Also, hybrid publishers, like Haggard’s, are differentiated from “vanity presses.” The vanity press preys upon unsuspecting authors by charging exorbitant fees, keeping author’s rights, delivering paltry royalties, charging high prices for copies of their books, and doing little to no marketing.

I’m very excited by the introduction of L10 Press to Richmond. Haggard has assembled a talented team of professionals to bring local authors to the market. Check them out at Life in 10 Minutes Press.

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Evoking Emotion in Fiction: 7 Pragmatic Ways to Make Readers Give a Damn

In Writer’s Digest, author Dustin Grimmel gives these 7 ways to engage readers. Do you agree?

  • Evoking Emotion #1: Positive moral judgments about the protagonist
  • Evoking Emotion #2: A protagonist who wants something really badly
  • Evoking Emotion #3: A protagonist who pursues their desires
  • Evoking Emotion #4: A protagonist who never gives up
  • Evoking Emotion #5: Characters who do the right thing
  • Evoking Emotion #6: The benefits of sorrow
  • Evoking Emotion #7: Characters helped by unseen hands

Read more at Writers Digest.

Hollywood comes calling for self-published authors

Film and TV production companies are increasingly turning to self-published authors to pick up potential screen blockbusters.

The latest indie writer to get a call from Hollywood is best-selling thriller author Mark Dawson.

Advanced negotiations are taking place with a leading TV production company that wants to snap up his Beatrix Rose series, according to a report in The Guardian.

Mark Dawson is a prolific author of thrillers who has written four series of novels. The John Milton books feature a hitman while the Beatrix Rose series also has the leading character of an assassin. The Soho Noir novels are set in London from 1940 to 1970 and there’s also the Isabella Rose thriller series (she’s the daughter of Beatrix Rose).

 

 

Read More at Roger Packer’s Blog.

B&N CEO Fired – no explanation

In a brief statement released late Tuesday afternoon, the retailer said CEO Demos Parneros was terminated for “violations of the Company’s policies.” While not saying what policies Parneros violated, B&N said his termination “is not due to any disagreement with the Company regarding its financial reporting, policies, or practices or any potential fraud relating thereto.” In addition to being fired immediately, Parneros will not receive any severance, B&N said. B&N said Parneros’s removal was undertaken by its board of directors, who were advised by the law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP.

 Read More at Publishers Weekly

B&N – Rocky Times

With sales at Barnes & Noble in the fiscal year ended April 28 dropping 6% compared to fiscal 2017 and a host of one-time charges contributing to a net loss of $125.5 million compared to net income of $22.0 million in 2017, CEO Demos Parneros acknowledged that fiscal 2018 was a “challenging year.” He said that some of the changes the company has made led to modest improvements in certain areas but told analysts during a conference call discussing the recent results that turnarounds take time. Parneros announced B&N’s latest strategic plan in March.

One of the most immediate effects of the new plan was that B&N cut expenses by $52 million in fiscal 2018, with about $40 million of that coming from eliminating 3,000 full-time retail positions as it created a new store labor model. According to B&N’s 10-K filing with the SEC, the company had 8,000 full-time retail employees as of April 28, down from 11,000 a year ago. The number of part-time employees remained at 15,000. ($16.2 million in severance payments were among B&N’s one-time charges.)

 Read More at Publishers Weekly

Little House on the Prairie – Banned

The Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association, voted on Saturday to strip the name of Laura Ingalls Wilder from a popular children’s book award, months after a task force set out to consider the long-running scholarly discussion around “anti-Native and anti-Black sentiments” in the author’s work.

The Laura Ingalls Wilder Award honors an author or illustrator whose books have made “a significant and lasting contribution to children’s literature.” It will now be called The Children’s Literature Legacy Award.

Read More at Pubisher’s Weekly